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college town in america by people who ranked us. so when i was elected mayor i got the best spot in the city in front of city hall which is in the heart of our downtown. what are we going to do with this? i got to park benches we were not using anymore in the tree was being cut down. we hollowed out the tree and sliced it into chunks and put flowers in it and created the smallest park in the city. instead of reserve for mayor we have assigned it said reserve for mayor and friends. automatically small things change instantly the way people thought about how much space we use for cars. change was possible on a small budget and it changed the way people protested my decision. they take right away to the parking spot. i didn't anticipate that one. they say the sign says friends right there. that kind of creativity -- in the last thing is, the first is energy in the second is creativity and the last thing as moral authority. i mean in an unambiguous sense of what is right and what is wrong and fair. it is not true of everybody but for a lot of us that same six euro bill as a dinosaur.
in the next legislative session which is right around the corner. we know we have an election in just a few weeks and a lame-duck session and then we will be returning for the 113th congress so i appreciate you being here and i appreciate everybody being here for your session in washington and with that, this hearing is adjourned. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we take you live now to georgetown university where we are waiting for discussion to get underway on the future of american democracy. while we wait for this event, here are some comments from first-time voters reacting to last night's presidential debate. the this from "washington journal." [inaudible conversations] >> host: first-time voters only, henry and greensboro north carolina, henry tell us your story. why are you a first-time voter quest. >> caller: i have always felt politics was politics but now when you say the 47%, what night you care about everybody in the next night 47%. i don't like a flip-flopper and to me it just sounds like a flip-flopper. and i don't understand. he wants to put
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
'm talking about the election. here i think the question really is i don't know how the election is going come out. i make no prediction. i ask myself if romney gets smashed, if he gets smashed, it would -- i happen to think the political problem in the country we have a center left party and we have a far right party. that is a structure problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. >> analytical judgment. [laughter] >> they've been simultaneously they have been at war with mas and physics at the same time. [laughter] on the deficit, it was, you know, deficit doesn't matter. and yeah and biology too a guy in missouri too. so the question to me is what happens the morning after the morning after the election if romney loses? the morning after they'll say it wasn't because he wasn't far night enough. i wonder the morning after the morning after. a lot of people say we have gone too far to the right. we need a different republican party. we need a center right republican party. i think the country needs. because it needs to be a check on the left and the center left, and it's the
and election campaigns? >> the major effort has been going on for some time to come in various ways, to force business to back away from participating in both the election process and the process of governance. which loses sight of the fact that the constitution fundamentally guarantees us the right to petition the government, and the supreme court continues to support that right. and why do people want us not to do it? because for years, you know, people in business were reticent to, and then we started getting organized and now are all saying wait a minute, we didn't invite him to this party. we like our deal where we just make our arrangements and when our elections. well, good luck. it ain't happening. and american businesses are beginning to see that if they don't play any game, somebody else is going to steal their lunch. >> and that's a good think it is a good thing that american businesses are getting involved. i said earlier we do not have a clinical action committee at the nam but we are forming one. we had a debate for 40 years, and manufactures are very concerned about the future
campaign seemed to have slid into a fully attained, which we see each and every election season, which is your upper train your opponent in ways that voters have heard time and time again. the republican, senator kyrillos, you are portrayed as friend of the rich, someone will make middle-class pay more because the rich shouldn't have any sort of implications of their taxes changed. senator menendez, you will portrayed be a tax-and-spend liberal. let's move beyond clichÉs right now. tell me specifically, what one thing about your opponent makes him less qualified than you to serve in the u.s. senate. senator kyrillos, you can go first. kyrillos: well, senator menendez mentions the middle-class. he mentioned it tonight, does it fairly often. but up, the middle-class is not doing very well at all. we've got to do better. and so, you know, i read the press releases that you put out and i've heard your opening statement, but i don't hear any action items about how we are going to do it better. and so, i've got a plan. i know that if we do what we've been doing, more of the same, well, we w
, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i t
the value of products, $24 billion. and i was elected to congress was 12 billion. ag was 60 billion then, now over 200. we created a tremendous amount of wealth that has been built within the value added ag component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 seconds to respond. christie: you know, we have not been able to get much done. my energy policy is making sure that we just create energy positions, short term, long term, medium-term growth for energy, but i just want to make sure that everybody knows that i will be a consistent champion for wind and renewable fuels in this district and congressman king has not been. [applause] moderator: your response, congressman? steve: i happen to be the american wind energy champion designated by the american wind energy association. [applause] i am supported by the renewable fuel and it -- industry across the board so far as i know. we are the number one renewable energy producing congressional district and all of america, the
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
to the election of president obama and the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2008, to the question of transparency and the kind of good government i think we all envisioned. from my perspective, from about 2010, that energy at kind of dissipated. a lot of efforts have gone toward a lot of things, and we weren't seeing that sort of dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize. we can imagine knowing what the power of data is but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work that i will describe your that results in some grades that i will talk about. grading is a cruel art but it sometimes is necessary art how we communicate things. what he did is i looked at the problem of sort of lacking transparency efforts around 2010, and it looked to me like maybe the transparency community have not communicated well enough to the government side. what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone up if it didn't have a direction, didn't have a destination. and so i sat down with some technical people, i'm a lawyer so i have to go back and learn about how these com
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10